Battle Field,
DaNang, 1969

BIOGRAPHY

Barbara Gluck was born and grew up in New York City, the only child of Hungarian immigrant parents. She graduated from New York University with a BA in Communication Arts and a major in journalism. After graduation she worked for two magazines and moved on to advertising.

Barbara spent six years in the advertising profession. She was hired as Art Buyer and Exhibits Director at McCann Erickson, where she conceived and curated the first major Richard Avedon Exhibit in New York City, in 1964. Critic John Durniak, reviewing the exhibit in Popular Photography Magazine, wrote: “There has never been a photographic show like this one…it’s the most spectacular photographic show ever.”

Barbara moved on to Benton & Bowles to become Senior Art Buyer and Special Projects Director. Two years later the President of Young & Rubicam hired her to be his Special Advisor in the area of Projects & Events – including creative department film programs, seminars, special shows, exhibitions and professional lecture series.

In April of 1968, Barbara was invited by a friend, Joseph Treaster, a New York Times correspondent, covering the Vietnam War, to go on a three week vacation to Southeast Asia. They met up in Hong Kong where she bought some cameras and they did some sightseeing, then flew into Saigon, where her friend worked. She never returned to her high-powered advertising job.

She arrived in Saigon two days before a major offensive by the North Vietnamese, remained in Vietnam, started photographing and selling her work to The New York Times, AP, Newsweek. She was based in Saigon for almost four years during the War – 1968-69 / 1972-73. She returned home in 1970-71 and married Mr. Treaster. The New York Times sent them back to Vietnam as a team in January of 1972, and they covered the war through November of 1973.

Barbara was the only photographer (and certainly the only woman) to:

* fly a 14 hour B-52 bombing mission over North Vietnam, from the Strategic Air Command Base in Guam.

* fly on and off air craft carriers (USS Kitty Hawk & USS Saratoga) to cover the pilots bombing Vietnam (only woman — 5,000 men on board).

* spend 24 hours with the enemy — the Viet Cong — in their territory.

All of these were NY Times assignments that she initiated. She was interested in covering the war in ways and in places it was not commonly covered. Her courage to risk was always present.

In 1973, for her work in Vietnam, the World Press Photo Foundation honored her with an “Outstanding News Photo” of the year award. In 1974 she was Awarded a “Poynter Fellowship” by Yale University for Excellence in Journalism.

In Vietnam Barbara went through a powerful spiritual awakening. The result was an extraordinary expansion of her vision. Her life and her photography took an amazingly different turn. She moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1976 and became an Art Photographer, while also continuing to do her photojournalism.


Her Art Photography manifested in several exhibits:
“The Stream”, “Light Paintings from the Etheric World”
and “Flora—Fauna Images.” They became highly
lauded major museum and gallery Exhibits that traveled
to major museums around the country. Ms. Gluck traveled
extensively lecturing on her work at Museums, Colleges
and Universities. She also Co-Produced The First New
Mexico Film and Photography Festival in Santa Fe's
Armory for the Arts. And in 1978-79 she worked as a
Public Relations and Media  Consultant to the NavajoTribe -- for the Navajo Hopi Land Dispute Commission.

In 1979 she was asked to be on the Board of The Santa Fe College of Natural Medicine. Healing and healers had become a great interest of hers. In 1984 she moved into a career as a healing facilitator – on the cutting edge of the past life movement – when she and a friend, Chris Griscom, opened The Light Institute of Galisteo, outside of Santa Fe. Her Insitute was put on the world map by actress Shirley MacLaine, one of their first clients, in her book: “Dancing in the Light.”

In 1988, Barbara left The Light Institute and architected a powerful new healing work she called “The Soul Matrix Clearing, Healing and Empowerment Process.” Barbara has taken this work around the world over the last fifteen years – facilitating it as well as training others to facilitate it.

B&W Magazine, a Fine Photography Collectors magazine, “Spot Lighted” Ms. Gluck in a six page spread in their June 2004 issue.  They started the story by saying:  “Barbara Gluck's photographs have been called the ‘Cartier-Bresson of the Vietnam War’ and rightly so -- he was a role model, compelling her to put a human face on war.”
See the full story in the Press Section on this site.

In September of 2004, The J.Paul Getty Museum of Los Angeles purchased a portfolio of sixteen of Ms. Gluck's vintage Vietnam photographs for their permenant collection. 

In September 2005 an exhibit opened at The J. Paul Getty Museum called "Pictures for the Press" --which ran thru January 2006.  This exhibit contained only 35 photographs, which were selected by the curators as the most outstanding Icon Images of the most important historical events from the 1940's thru the1970's. 

Ms. Gluck was  one of two women photographers (the only living one) whose work was selected to be in this exhibit. Her famous photograph of "The Shell Shocked Woman from the Seige of AnLoc"  -- was chosen and also selected to be one of nine photographs shown in the exhibit booklet.  In writing about her photograph in the “Pictures for the Press” booklet, the curators wrote:
“Picture Editors often choose photographs that resonate with the public on both cultural and emotional levels.  Front-page news images depicting human trauma, like the one by Barbara Gluck  for The New York Times, of a shell-shocked woman from the 1972 seige of An Loc, in South Vietnam, sometimes bear a resemblance to medieval and Renaissance religious depictions of the Lamentation and the Entombment of Christ.”

Ms. Gluck returned to Vietnam in March of 2005, for the first time in 32 years -- as a guest of the Vietnamese Government, to attend a “Journalist Conference of Reunion and Reconciliation”  for journalists that covered the war and contemporary Vietnamese Journalists.  She spent three months after the conference traveling throughout Vietnam -- re-photographing the Country, the Culture, the People and the lingering reminders of the War -- for a book she is currently producing called:  “VIETNAM: THEN AND NOW”.  Former Los Angeles Times Correspondent, David Lamb, will be writing the text for the book.  Ms. Gluck will write a Photographers Insight and Intro text. 

The underlying theme of the book is healing and reconciliation.  Surely no one can view these photographs without realizing that today Vietnam is a Country, not a War -- and that the pain of the past has been mostly buried and the opportunities for peace and prosperity whole heartedly embraced.  The Vietnamese have not forgotten, but they have forgiven.

Ms Gluck currently resides in Santa Monica, CA.

PROFESSIONAL CAREER INFORMATION:

Photographs Published in/by:
The New York Times , The Washington Post,
Time Magazine, Newsweek, Newsday, New Times,
People, Playboy,Penthouse, Ms Magazine, Look,
The London Sunday Telegraph, TheTimes of London,
The Associated Press, World Press Photo 1973

Major One-Woman Exhibitions:
*Cross Campus Library Gallery, Yale University: “Vietnam Portfolio,” November,1974
*Image Gallery, New York: “Vietnam: Pain onthe Periphery of the War,” February, 1975
*Popular Photography Gallery, New York: “Vietnam Portfolio,” August, 1975
*Hills Gallery, Santa Fe, NM: “Flora Fauna mages” July, 1979
*Museum of Fine Arts, Santa Fe, NM: “The Stream” (with Forrest Moses paintings), September, 1979
*Environmental Design College, Boulder, Colorado: “Flora Fauna Images” November, 1979
*Museum of the Southwest, Midland, TX: “The Stream”, November, 1980
Reed Whipple Cultural Center, Las Vegas, Nev:“Light Paintings from the Etheric World,” Nov., 1982
*Hamline University Art Gallery, Minneapolis, Minn.: “The Stream”, October, 1983

Group Exhibits – International, Domestic and Traveling:

*World Press Photo Awards Exhibition, Amsterdam, Holland, 1973
*International Center of Photography, New York: “Women See Men,” April, 1975
*The Women’s Inter-Art Center, New York: “Photo*Flow: New Directions” June, 1975
*Ms. Magazine, New York, sponsored “The Decade of Women,” 1975
*The United Nations “Year of the Woman” Celebration Exhibit,
Breadth of Vision: Portfolio of Women Photographers,” October,1975
*Neikrug Gallery, New York: “Is There a Female Camera?” December, 1975
*Soho Gallery, New York: “Images from Angkor Vat,” February, 1976
*International Center of Photography, New York: “Remarkable American Women,” July, 1976
*New Mexico Film & Photography Festival, Armory for the Arts, Santa Fe, NM:
“21 Photographers,” February, 1979
*United States Information Agency, Washington sponsored “Women in the Arts,”
*Museo des Artes in Sao Paolo, Brazil: International Exposition of Photography,
*Museum of Fine Arts, Santa Fe, NM: “Preserving This Moment -- Santa Fe 1987-88,” November, 1988, *The J.Paul Getty Museum of Los Angeles: "Pictures for the Press", Sept. 05-Jan. 06
,

Represented in the Permanent Collections of the following Institutions:
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
Museum of Fine Arts, Santa Fe, NM,
The International Center of Photography, New York, NY
The John Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, CA

Special War History: Only Woman to:
Fly a B-52 mission from SAC base on Guam over North Vietnam / for N.Y.Times
Boat down the Mekong, spend 24 hours with Viet Cong in their Territory / for N.Y.Times
Fly to two aircraft carriers: USS Saratoga & USS Kitty Hawk in Gulf of Tonkin / for N.Y.Times

Honors:
1973 World Press Photo Award, Amsterdam Holland for: Outstanding News Photos
1974 Poynter Fellowship, Awarded by Yale University for: Excellence in Journalism

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© Copyright 2004 Barbara Gluck • All rights reserved
Helicopter over
Binh Dinh Province, 1973
Aboard USS Kitty Hawk,
Gulf of Tonkin, 1968
Wing of B-52, SAC Base, Guam, 1972